Category Archives: Detection and Control

Updated Michigan guide to Phragmites control

Michigan’s A Guide to the Control and Management of Invasive Phragmites has recently been updated.  This 3rd edition has expanded content on how to distinguish between the native and European strain of Phragmites and new recommendations on treatment strategies.

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Posted in Detection and Control, Phragmites australis, Restoration | Leave a comment

Composting invasive plants

Composting invasive plants has to be done carefully to fully kill seeds and other potential propagules.  Researchers in Texas built a composting facility to handle wetland invasive plants and report on their experience in an article in Invasive Plant Science … Continue reading

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Posted in Detection and Control, Eichornia crassipes, Texas, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Invasives in British forests

The magazine “Wood Wise” from Great Britain has an issue on managing invasive species (mostly plants) in woodlands.  They cover several species also considered invasive in North America, giant hogweed and Himalayan balsam, and several species native to North America … Continue reading

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Defeating garlic mustard

For those of you faced with small patches of garlic mustard, or if you have access to a lot of volunteer labor, a new study  illuminates the best times to pull or cut plants.  Plants pulled before any seeds begin … Continue reading

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Posted in Alliaria petiolata, Detection and Control | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Trendiest weed control method? Goats!

Goats seem to be the hottest new weed control method.  They have been used for weed control probably since they were first domesticated, but companies offering rental goats specialized in weed control are, growing like weeds.  Goats offer an alternative … Continue reading

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Using benthic barriers to stop Eurasian watermilfoil

Benthic barriers use geotextile fabric, plastic or other materials placed over the ground under water to stop the growth of unwanted rooted aquatic plants (for more information on benthic barriers see http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/management/aqua023.html).  A recent study looked at how long barriers needed … Continue reading

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Posted in Detection and Control, Myriophyllum spicatum | Leave a comment

Weed sniffing dogs

The Montana based non-profit, Working Dogs for Conservation, http://www.workingdogsforconservation.org/, trains dogs to sniff out invasive plants. The dogs can sniff out at least 5 species, including Dyer’s Woad (Isatis tinctoria).  Their noses are especially useful in detecting small populations of plants in … Continue reading

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Posted in Detection and Control, Isatis tinctoria | Leave a comment